Illustrations for The New Yorker

  • Illustrations for The New Yorker
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    Since I was an art student at ArtCenter College of Design, I'd always dreamed of doing work for The New Yorker. After a few years into the illustration career, I've been fortunate to contribute art for their pages. These pieces were done digitally with Procreate on the 12.9" iPad Pro and finished in Adobe Photoshop on a Windows PC.
  • End Times in “Terminator: Dark Fate”
    Client: The New Yorker
    AD: Chris Curry

    Under Tim Miller’s direction, the Arnold Schwarzenegger franchise finds a novel groove.
  • "Medea" Reflects a Modern Tragedy
    Client: The New Yorker
    AD: Chris Curry

    For the theatre review by critic Vinson Cunningham of Simon Stone’s contemporary adaptation of “Medea,” which stars real-life partners Rose Byrne and Bobby Cannavale as the on-stage partners Medea and Jason.

    A new production uses the familiar thrusts of Euripides to find the reality in long-running theatrical archetypes.
    Medea is originally a tragedy written by the ancient Greek playwright Euripides, and tells the story of Medea’s revenge against her ex-husband Jason for betraying her with another woman.
  • Akhnaten
    Client: The New Yorker
    AD: Neeta Patel

    An illustration for the Goings On About Town section in The New Yorker for the opera Akhnaten.

     “Akhnaten” recounts the brief reign of its titular pharaoh, who attempted to institute monotheistic worship around the god of the sun, with radiant and numinous sonorities.
  • Art of the Score: Psycho
    Client: The New Yorker
    AD: Neeta Patel

    "Anticipating the countdown to opening night, the New York Philharmonic makes its transition from summer to fall with an extremely enticing offering in its “Art of the Score” series. The slashing cue that accompanies the notorious shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” is equally indelible, but the film’s entire strings-only score, by Bernard Herrmann, is a master class in evoking uncanny tension through economical means."
  • What Happens If We Stop Pretending?
    Client: The New Yorker
    AD: Sebit Min

    The editorial illustration for one of The New Yorker's top 25 most read articles from 2019.

    The writing is an adaptation from a speech Jonathan Franzen gave on climate change. Franzen argues is that we should stop pretending that humanity can fix climate change. Humans are doomed, and should a) admit that and b) realize that reducing carbon emissions, as an all-in political goal, is kinda pointless. Instead, we should acknowledge that any world-improving action—reducing inequality or securing fair elections—will in some ways help us when the inevitable apocalypse comes.
  • Orwell On The Future: 1984
    Client: The New Yorker
    AD: Sebit Min

    Republished from The New Yorker archives from the June 18, 1949 issue, this illustration accompanies Lionel Trilling’s original book review of 1984, way before it became the cultural phenomenon it is today.

    George Orwell’s “1984” predicts a state of things far worse than any we have ever know.
  • “Parasite” Explores What Lies Beneath
    Client: The New Yorker
    AD: Chris Curry

    The unequal world envisioned by Bong Joon-ho could be heading for class war or a brokered peace—for savagery or stillness.