Hansel and Gretel

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    H  A  N  S  E  L  A  N  D  G  R  E  T  E  L

     Grimm Brothers
     
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  • Hard by a great forest dwelt a poor wood-cutter with his wife and his two children. The boy was called Hansel and the girl Gretel. He had little to bite and to break, and once, when great dearth fell on the land, he could no longer procure even daily bread.

  •  "Be quiet, Gretel," said Hansel, "do not distress yourself, I will soon find a way to help us." 
  • It was now three mornings since they had left their father's house. They began to walk again, but they always came deeper into the forest, and if help did not come soon, they must die of hunger and weariness. 
  • When it was mid-day, they saw a beautiful bird sitting on a bough, which sang so delightfully that they stood still and listened to it. 
  • The brushwood was lighted, and when the flames were burning very high, the woman said, "Now, children, lay yourselves down by the fire and rest, we will go into the forest and cut some wood. When we have done, we will come back and fetch you away".
  • The moon shone brightly, and the white pebbles which lay in front of the house glittered like real silver pennies. Hansel stooped and stuffed the little pocket of his coat with as many as he could get in.
  • But they did not find it. They walked the whole night and all the next day too from morning till evening, but they did not get out of the forest, and were very hungry, for they had nothing to eat but two or three berries, which grew on the ground. And as they were so weary that their legs would carry them no longer, they lay down beneath a tree and fell asleep.
  • And when its song was over, it spread its wings and flew away before them, and they followed it until they reached a little house, on the roof of which it alighted. And when they approached the little house they saw that it was built of bread and covered with cakes, but that the windows were of clear sugar.
  •  "We will bake first," said the old woman, "I have already heated the oven, and kneaded the dough." She pushed poor Gretel out to the oven, from which flames of fire were already darting. "Creep in," said the witch, "and see if it properly heated, so that we can put the bread in." And once Gretel was inside, she intended to shut the oven and let her bake in it, and then she would eat her, too.
  •  "We cannot cross," said Hansel, "I see no foot-plank, and no bridge.
     "And there is also no ferry," answered Gretel, "but a white duck is swimming there. If I ask her, she will help us over." (...) The good little duck did so, and when they were once safely across and had walked for a short time, the forest seemed to be more and more familiar to them, and at length they saw from afar their father's house.

  • black pilot 0.5 + colored pencils
     
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    ~~ ​T H A N K Y O U ~~